The International Disability Rights policy team includes, from left: Foreign Affairs Officer Lynne Madnick, Special Advisor Ann Cody, and Foreign Affairs Officer Charlie Kellett. Photo by Robin Smith

International Disability Rights

By Charlie Kellett Disability rights are human rights. As the United Nations’ (U.N.) Universal Declaration of Human Rights states, all human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. Yet the rights of...
The Rambla of Montevideo is an avenue that goes all along the coastline of Montevideo, Uruguay, and also the longest continuous sidewalk in the world. At a length of over 22.2 uninterrupted kilometres, the promenade runs along the Río de la Plata and continues down the entire coast of Montevideo. Photo by Alejo Vazquez Young

Uruguay

By Jacqueline D. Mourot Often overshadowed by its larger and more well-known neighbors, Brazil and Argentina, Uruguay is a beacon of democratic and economic stability in Latin America. Uruguay’s democratic government, strong institutions, and strategic...
The 4,905-passenger cruise ship Ovation of the Seas, which is part of the Royal Caribbean International fleet, is one of 29 luxury liners that the Department of State personnel across Australia tracked during the coronavirus pandemic in early 2020. The vessel is pictured here docked near the landmark Sydney Harbor Bridge at Circular Quay, Sydney, Jan. 2. Photo by Paul Giblin

Sea Odyssey

By Paul Giblin When the coronavirus pandemic washed over the globe, U.S. consular staff members across Australia located and tracked thousands of Americans who were at sea on cruise ships as governments worldwide closed their...
Members of OBO’s Strategic Priorities team met virtually for their Quarterly Program Review (QPR) planning session, May 27. The QPR briefing is a great way for the team to assess the progress made in each key area over the past quarter. Photo by Christine Foushee

Revising Priorities

By Donna McIntire-Byrd Early into the tenure of Director Addison “Tad” Davis IV at the Bureau of Overseas Buildings Operations (OBO), the bureau established a set of strategic goals—Security, Resiliency, and Stewardship—to align OBO’s operations...

Commemorating History

By Noel Doyle During the final months of World War II, the leaders of the three great Allied powers involved in the conflict—U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill, and Soviet Premier...
Reasonable accommodations can include hardware such as keyboards, magnifiers, or computer mice to assist employees with disabilities. Photo by Roberta Mather

Remote Accessibility during COVID-19

By Rich McCarthy   When the Department of State moved to maximum telework, many employees faced a new challenge: figuring out how to complete their tasks while working remotely. The Bureau of Global Talent Management’s Office...
The U.N. Security Council Resolution 2475 on Persons with Disabilities in Armed Conflict was adopted unanimously at the vote and session, June 2019. Photo courtesy of the U.S. Mission to the United Nations

Removing Barriers

By Sofija Korac The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), which celebrates its 30th anniversary July 26, prohibits discrimination through all aspects of public life by removing barriers and increasing accessibility so that all individuals can...
When designing the main entrance pavilion for the new U.S. Embassy in Oslo, the permit authorities asked OBO’s architects to add way-finding guides for low-sighted persons who use long white canes. There is no such requirement in either the ADA or the ABA, however, OBO successfully completed the project. Photo by Ron Tomasso

OBO’s Barrier-Free Accessibility Program

by Ron Tomasso Way-finding guides, an accessible feature that assists low-sighted individuals who use long white canes, were added by OBO to the design of the entrance of the new U.S. embassy in Oslo. Photo...

Post of the Month

Office Spotlight

Making a Statement

The image is split down the middle with the "Making a Statement" logo in white on a blue background on the left, followed by the name Glenda Siegrist. Siegrist smiles on the right.