In Memoriam


January 2021

Elizabeth C. “Betty” Brook, 101, died Nov. 13, in Sarasota, Fla. Brook received a bachelor’s degree from Knox College in Galesburg, Ill. She taught history for one year prior to joining the U.S. Naval Reserve WAVES during World War II. After the war, she joined the Foreign Service. During her career, she served in different capacities at posts in Nigeria, Venezuela, Turkey, Morocco, Lebanon, Kenya, Germany, and Vietnam. Brook retired in 1984 and enjoyed volunteering for arts organizations, playing golf, and playing contract bridge. She is survived by many nieces and nephews.

Charles “Chuck” Keil, 75, died Nov. 25, in Annapolis, Md. Keil received bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Texas, and a master’s degree from the National War College. He served in the U.S. Navy from 1967 to 1971. Keil joined the Foreign Service in 1975 and served in consular positions in Panama, Milan, Genoa, Guayaquil, Guatemala, Tijuana, and Rome, as well as domestically in Washington. A career member of the Senior Foreign Service, after retiring in 2002, he loved to travel, including long road trips in the United States and multi-day walking excursions in Europe. Keil is survived by his wife, Diane; two sons, Joe and Matt; and five grandchildren.

Diane Kirk, 70, died July 25, in Upper Marlboro, Md. Kirk joined the Foreign Service as an ambassador’s office management specialist overseas. In retirement, she enjoyed traveling and spending time with family. She was predeceased by her father, Albert; and her siblings, James, Vivian, Doris, and Albert. Kirk is survived by a daughter, Fawn; her mother, Macy; two grandsons, a great-grandson, and four siblings.


December 2020

Diego Cortes Asencio, 89, died Oct. 6, in Palm Beach, Fla. Ascencio served as a sergeant in the U.S. Army during the Korean War. In 1952, he graduated from Georgetown University and promptly entered the Foreign Service. He began his career as a vice consul in Mexico, followed by serving as a political officer in Panama. He served in Lisbon as a special assistant to the assistant secretary for Inter-American Affairs/coordinator of the alliance for progress, deputy chief of mission in Portugal, political counselor in Brazil, deputy chief of mission in Venezuela, and ambassador to Colombia. While most of his 30-year career was spent in Latin America, he also served in Lisbon. After completing an assignment as assistant secretary of state for Consular Affairs, he served as ambassador to Brazil. He retired in 1991 and moved to Palm Beach, Fla., where he served as executive director of the Florida International Affairs Commission. Asencio was predeceased by his daughter, Anne. He is survived by his wife of 67 years, Nancy; four children, Manuel, Diego Carlos, Francis, and Maria; eight grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren.

Robert “Bob” Lee Caffrey, 77, died Oct. 22, in Reston, Va. Caffrey served for four years in the U.S. Air Force in Alaska and England. He joined the Foreign Service in 1965 and first served at post in Ankara, where he met and married his wife, Marilyn. He then went on to serve in Warsaw, San Salvador, and Bonn. In 1987, he served as a deputy assistant secretary in Washington. He retired in 1993 after serving for 31 years and went on to work as a consultant at AT&T in Virginia. Caffrey enjoyed golfing and spent many years on the baseball field coaching little league and senior league baseball. He was predeceased by his son, Robert. He is survived by his wife; a son, Michael; and two grandchildren.

Anne Hepburn Edwards, 85, died Aug. 1, in London, England. Edwards studied music at the Royal Academy of London before working for the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC). In the mid-1960s, however, she moved to the United States to live with her sister and became a U.S. citizen. Edwards joined the Foreign Service in 1970 and served as an office management specialist in Caracas, Hong Kong, Brussels, Moscow, Rome, London, and Rangoon. She retired in 2000 and returned to London where she enjoyed attending the opera, hiking, and gardening. She is survived by a sister, Gillian; a brother; and several nieces and nephews.

Diana B. Kniazuk, 77, died Sept. 13, in Buffalo, N.Y. Kniazuk graduated from Erie Community College and began her career in the private sector. She later joined the Department and served as a secretary at posts around the world, including Poland, Russia, Vietnam, and several African countries. After retirement, she moved back to her hometown and enjoyed celebrating her heritage by becoming active in many Polish and Ukrainian organizations. She also enjoyed volunteering with veterans and was active in her church. Kniazuk is survived by a brother, Ted; cousin Donald; and several nieces, nephews, and great-nieces and nephews.

Paul D. Molineaux, 82, died April 18, in Washington, D.C. In 1957, Molineaux graduated from Georgetown University. He then studied at the Instituto León XIII in Madrid and obtained a master’s degree from the Otto-Suhr Institut of the Freie Universität in Berlin. After his studies, he served as captain of military intelligence in the U.S. Army Reserve. Following his military tour, he joined the Foreign Service and served in Can Tho, Frankfurt, Beirut, Bonn, and Rio de Janeiro. In Washington, he served as chief of the Bureau of Intelligence and Research Watch Office (Operation’s Center), chairman of the Secretary of State’s Open Forum, and director for Belgium, Netherlands, and Luxembourg in the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Policy. Molineaux is survived by his wife, Diana; a brother, Charles; a sister, Rita; and several nephews and nieces.

Edward J. Perkins, 92, died Nov. 7 in Washington, D.C. After serving abroad in the Army and the Marine Corps, Perkins earned a bachelor’s degree from the University of Maryland. He served for a couple of years with USAID and received his master’s degree from the University of Southern California (USC) before joining the Foreign Service in 1972. He earned a Ph.D. from USC in 1978. In Washington, he served as director general of the Foreign Service and as director of the Office of West African Affairs, among others. Overseas, Perkins served as a counselor for political affairs in Accra, deputy chief of mission in Monrovia, and he was appointed as ambassador to Liberia, South Africa—in the final days of apartheid—the United Nations, and finally Australia before retiring as a career minister in 1996. In retirement, Perkins went on to teach at the University of Oklahoma and was a senior advisor to a consulting firm in Washington. Perkins was a founding member of the Thursday Luncheon Group and the Association of Black American Ambassadors. He was predeceased by his wife Lucy Ching-mei Liu. He is survived by two daughters, Katherine and Sarah; and four grandchildren. 

David Shapiro, 69, died Sept. 17, in New York, N.Y. Shapiro received a B.A. and a J.D. from the University of Pennsylvania and an M.B.A. from Columbia University. As a Foreign Service officer, he served in Sudan, Tel Aviv, the Sinai Desert, the International Civil Aviation Organization in Montreal, and at the U.S. Mission to the United States in New York. Shapiro is survived by his wife, Dayle; and a sister, Jody.


November 2020

Michael B. Bretz, 68, died Aug. 10, in Bealeton, Va. Bretz joined the Foreign Service in 1987 and served at posts in New Delhi, Jakarta, Bangkok, Brussels, Manila, Kinshasa, and in Washington. A career member of the Senior Foreign Service, he served as deputy chief information officer of foreign operations in the Bureau of Information Resources Management prior to his retirement in 2017. Bretz is survived by his wife, Chaveewan; three children; and two granddaughters.

Patrick “David” Husar, 67, died May 9, in Arlington, Va. Husar joined the Foreign Service in 1976. He served as a consular officer at posts in Pakistan, India, and the Philippines before transitioning to Civil Service. He retired in 2016 and enjoyed long walks around the Washington area, was an avid reader, and was dedicated to his faith. He is survived by his wife, Jonahlyn; a brother Michael; and extended family in the Philippines.

Kenneth Wayne Irick, 61, died June 24, in Summerville, S.C. Irick served in the U.S. Navy from 1979-1987. After his tour of duty, he worked at the Department of the Navy prior to joining the Department of State in 1997. He is survived by his mother, Doris; his wife, Marie; five children, Andrea, Stephen, Sarina, Miranda, and Garrett; three grandchildren; and one sister.

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John Pouris, 93, died June 6, in Porto Alegre, Brazil. Pouris joined the Foreign Service in 1961. He served as a consular officer in Brazil, a press attaché in Iran, Vietnam, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Nigeria, and finally in Washington prior to retiring in 1987. In retirement, Porous enjoyed traveling with his wife Evanice, cooking, and reading. He is survived by his wife; three children, Kyvele, Jason, and Zoie; four grandchildren, and several great grandchildren.

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Nivea Ribera, 86, died July 24, in The Villages, Fla. Ribera entered the Foreign Service in 1993 and served in Panama, Nairobi, Ft. Lauderdale, and in Washington. She accompanied her Foreign Service husband, Robert “Bob” on assignments to Copenhagen, Bonn and Santo Domingo. She retired in 1992. Ribera is survived by her husband, and many grandchildren.

Robert William Smith, 86, died August 21, in Rockville, Md. Smith served in the U.S. Air Force prior to joining the Foreign Service in 1960. He served as alternate representative for the U.S. at the 1967 Conference on Denuclearization in Latin America, acting director in Sinai, and he also served in positions at Bonn and Poznan. After retiring from the Foreign Service, he worked as a consultant in the aviation field for two decades. He also was a member of the Maryland Air Guard 135th Tactical Airlift. He was a lifelong runner, continuing to participate in races well into his eighties. Smith was predeceased by his wife, Mary Lou. He is survived by two children.


October 2020

Sue Ford Patrick, 73, died July 6, in Pompano Beach, Fla. Patrick received her bachelor’s degree in 1967 from the College of Notre Dame of Maryland, then pursued graduate studies at the University of Virginia. Five years later, she joined the Foreign Service. During her career, Patrick served in Thailand, Kenya, Côte d’Ivoire, Rwanda—where she served as deputy chief of mission—Haiti, and Johannesburg, where she served as post’s first female U.S. consul general. She also served in several positions in Washington and as a diplomat-in-residence at Morehouse and Spelman colleges in Atlanta. Patrick later received two master’s degrees from Boston University and the National War College. She retired after 32 years with the Department and went on to serve as an advisor helping to negotiate a peace agreement in Senegal. In retirement, she also founded the Palm Aire Student Enrichment Group and served on education advisory committees. Patrick is survived by her husband, Henderson; two children, Lauren and Ibrahima; her mother, Mildred; two aunts, and three uncles.

Robert “Bob” Wheeler Smith, 70, died Aug. 13, in Grantsville, Md. Smith received a bachelor’s degree from Bucknell University, a master’s degree from the University of Rhode Island, and a doctorate in geography from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. In 1975, while finishing his doctorate thesis, he joined the Department of State’s Office of the Geographer. He later served in the Bureau of Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs, where he spent 31 years as a civil servant. Smith retired in 2006, and he enjoyed golfing and teaching international maritime boundary issues. He is survived by his wife of 43 years and fellow-Department employee Sandra; two daughters, Laura and Tesia; and his brother, Arthur.


September 2020

JoAnn Marie Liner, 61, died April 19, in Long Beach, Miss. Liner attended the University of New Orleans. She joined the Foreign Service and most recently served as an office management specialist in Suva. Her career included tours in Kinshasa, Reykjavik, Valletta, Taipei, Baghdad, Bridgetown, Port Au Prince, and Nassau. She also served domestically in the Office of the Special Representative for Syria Engagement. Liner also spent more than 20 years in the banking field. She enjoyed movies, fashion, reading, and writing, and recently, she published a romance novel. Liner is survived by her aunt, Clara.

John Anthony Matel, 65, died June 22, in Broadnax, Va. Matel attended the Universities of Wisconsin and Minnesota, and joined the Foreign Service with the U.S. Information Agency in 1984 as a public diplomacy officer. His posts included Brazil, Norway, Poland, Iraq, and the United States, and included serving as president of the Fulbright Commission in Brazil, senior international advisor at the Smithsonian Institution, and State Department fellow at the Fletcher School of Law & Diplomacy. After retiring in 2016, Matel pursued his passion for forestry and conservation, and actively managed nearly 500 acres of Virginia forest for timber, wildlife, and water quality. He is survived by his wife of 38 years, Christine Johnson; and three children, Mariza, Alex, and Espen.

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William Douglas McLain, 92, died July 5, in Tucson, Ariz. McLain served in the U.S. Navy from 1946-1948, and then attended the University of Illinois. In 1957, he joined the Foreign Service and spent more than 20 years at posts in Central and South America, the Caribbean, and Canada. In Washington, he served as a visits and ceremonial officer with the Office of Protocol, and as a political officer in the Office of Brazilian Affairs. McLain retired in 1978 and became an assistant professor at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee where he was also the assistant director of the Institute of World Affairs. In retirement, he was enrolled in the Astronomy Program at the University of Illinois, Springfield, and participated in research projects at the Henry Barber Observatory. He is survived by his wife of 33 years, Jean; and a daughter, Jo June.

Joseph Aaron Silberstein, 101, died July 11, in Greenwich, Conn. Silberstein graduated from City College in 1938 and went on to serve as a first lieutenant in the U.S. Army during World War II. He joined the Foreign Service in 1946 and served in Columbia, El Salvador, Chile, Austria, and Argentina. He also served as chief of the Division of Aviation Programs and Policies for the Bureau of Economic Affairs prior to retiring in 1975. In retirement, he helped seniors with their tax returns, volunteered with the Washington Ear radio service, and enjoyed traveling with his wife of 79 years, Sheila. Silberstein is survived by his wife; three children, eight grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren.


August 2020

Jane Ellen Becker, 69, died April 6, in Washington, D.C. Becker entered the Foreign Service in 1972. During her career she served at posts in Lisbon, Geneva, Moscow, and Austria where she served as ambassador to International Organizations in Vienna. She also served as a senior watch officer, deputy assistant secretary of International Organization Affairs, chief of staff for the undersecretary for management, principal deputy assistant secretary and acting assistant secretary in the Bureau of International Narcotics Affairs (INL), and on the faculty at the National Defense University. Becker left the Foreign Service in 2001 and served on the Civil Service as a senior advisor in INL until her retirement in 2013. She loved cats, and enjoyed being a mentor to her colleagues and friends. Becker is survived by her brother, Robert, and a nephew and niece.

Paul Gabriel Del Giudice, 91, died May 29, in Aldie, Va. Del Giudice served in the U.S. Navy  from 1948-1952 which ultimately launched his career in the communications field. In 1955, he joined the Foreign Service and, during his career, served at posts in Cambodia, Vietnam, France, Egypt, Lebanon, Austria, and Japan. Domestically, he served as chief in the Office of Communications at the Foreign Service Institute, chief of the Office of Communications Networks staff, and executive officer for the U.S. HotLine Committee. Del Giudice retired in 1985 but continued work as a contractor with the Department of State’s project to upgrade the U.S. Diplomatic Mission communications centers. In retirement, he enjoyed traveling on his boat and cruising around the world. He is survived by his wife of 29 years, Eileen.

Robert Bruce “Bon” Houston Jr., 96, died May 4, in Lake Ridge, Va. In 1943, Houston graduated from Harvard University and two years later he joined the Foreign Service. He served as deputy chief of mission in Sofia Bulgaria (where he served twice) and in Helsinki. He also served as a science counselor in Moscow, as well as in other positions at posts in Accra, Ghana, Germany, Austria, Scotland, and Poland. In 1962, he received his master’s degree from Indiana University. After 37 years in the Foreign Service, Houston retired and worked in declassification reviews. He was predeceased by his wife of 68 years, Ellen Rae “Suzy”. He is survived by three children, Robert (a retired FSO), Pamela, and Martha; five grandchildren; and one great grandchild.

Alfred H. “Mac” McGlinchey, 92, died April 12, in Alexandria, Va. McGlinchey served in the U.S. Army from 1945-1947 during the Allied occupation of Japan at the end of World War II. He later worked for the Radio Corporation of America in Korea; Jakarta, Indonesia; and San Juan before joining the Foreign Service in 1975. Serving as a security engineer officer for the Bureau of Diplomatic Security, McGlinchey served at posts in Nairobi, Athens, and Panama City before retiring after 17 years of service in 1992. In retirement, he enjoyed seeing his grandchildren, traveling, playing pool, listening to his favorite big band swing orchestras, and watching his beloved Boston Red Sox. McGlinchey is survived by his wife, Lucilla; two children, Daniel and Maureen; and three grandchildren.

Douglas Kai Rasmussen, 70, died May 6, in Potomac, Md. Rasmussen applied to join the Foreign Service in New Delhi in 1974 after Indira Gandhi’s government detonated India’s first nuclear bomb, precipitating an arms race on the subcontinent, and fueling his lifelong pacifism and interest in foreign affairs. He spent 33 years serving at posts in Thailand, Burma (now Myanmar), Malaysia, Laos, and Washington. He was deputy chief of mission in Rangoon from 1996-2000. A true lover of nature, in retirement, he enjoyed gardening, hiking, and camping with family and friends. Rasmussen is survived by his wife, Alice; two daughters, Caroline and Anne; and a granddaughter, Liana.

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Normand Redden, 100, died June 21, in London, England. In 1941, Redden served with the U.S. Army as a civilian employee until he joined the Foreign Service in 1945. Throughout his career, he served at posts in New Zealand, China, Israel, Canada, England, Italy, and in Washington. He served as consul general in Liverpool, Rome, and London. Redden retired in 1979. He was predeceased by his wife, Annabel. Redden is survived by three children, David, Nigel, and Melanie; and seven grandchildren.


July 2020

Stephen John Carrig, 72, died May 14, in Arlington, Va. Carrig served in the U.S. Army for  10 years as a counter-terrorism officer before he joined the Foreign Service. As an economics officer, Carrig served at overseas posts in Cuba, Malaysia, Pakistan, Nigeria, Kuwait, as well as short-term assignments in Iraq and Afghanistan. He retired in 2012 after 23-years of service, and joined his wife, Marjorie, a fellow Foreign Service officer, and their daughter Patricia, on assignment in Mexico City. Carrig is survived by his wife and daughter; two sisters, Cassie and Meg; a brother, Shaun; and many cousins, nieces, and nephews.

Carol Anne Dolezal, 67, died May 12, in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. She attended college at Loretto Heights in Colorado, and then joined the Foreign Service. During her career, she served in many different countries throughout Europe, Africa, and Asia. She enjoyed traveling and getting together with family and friends. She is survived by a brother, Edward; nephew, Patrick; two nieces, Laura and Kathryn; and four great nieces.

Simon Henshaw, 59, died June 9, in Conakry, Guinea. Henshaw received a bachelor’s degree from the University of Massachusetts Amherst and a master’s degree from the National War College. He joined the Foreign Service in 1985, and spent three decades serving in many different positions. Overseas, he served in Abidjan, Honduras as deputy chief of mission, and four other diplomatic posts. In Washington, he held many leadership positions, including executive secretary on the Cuba Accountability Review Board, and principal deputy assistant secretary and acting assistant secretary for the Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration. Most recently Henshaw served as the U.S. ambassador to the Republic of Guinea. Henshaw is survived by his wife, Jackie; and two children, Maddie and Sandy.

David A. Hughes, 81, died March 12, in Woodinville, Wash. Hughes graduated from the University of Washington and joined the Foreign Service in 1961. He served at posts in British Guyana, Hong Kong, China, Indonesia, India, and Hungary. After retirement, he founded the Pacific Northwest Hungarian American Chamber of Commerce. Hughes wrote several volumes of short stories about his experiences around the world. He is survived by his wife, Catherine; and three daughters, Maria, Sharon, and Morgan.

Leslie Wolzak Hyland, 62, died April 19, in Aldie, Va. Hyland joined the Civil Service in 1991 and most recently served in positions as acting deputy assistant secretary (DAS) for the Bureau of International Organization Affairs (IO), deputy DAS and office director for IO’s Office of Management Resources, and director for the Bureau of the Comptroller and Global Financial Services. During her career, she also served at posts in Japan and Ukraine. Outside of the Department, Hyland held the position as chief financial officer for the Broadcasting Board of Governors. She enjoyed exercise and avidly read documents written by the founding fathers. Hyland was preceded in death by her father, Johan. She is survived by her son, Christian Johan, and daughter, Sophia Elena, as well as her mother and two sisters.

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Albert Lester “Les” Glad, 81, died March 19, in Sarasota, Fla. Glad joined the Foreign Service in 1965 and served at posts in Lisbon, Angola, Jordan, Ghana, and Algeria. After retiring, he worked for the Soybean Association and a local property management company serving mainly military and U.S. government families on duty overseas. He enjoyed tennis, gardening, reading, golf, traveling, and keeping up with friends. Glad is survived by his wife, Katherine “Katy”; three children, Christina, Marina, and Nicholas; and two grandchildren.

Troy A. Grant, 44, died May 31, in Stafford, Va. Grant served in both the U.S. Marine Corps and the U.S. Army prior to joining the Department of State in 2004. He first served in the Bureau of Diplomatic Security, and in 2006, he joined the Bureau of Consular Affairs as a distribution facilities specialist. Grant is survived by his parents, Harrison and Diane; his wife, Rosemary; two children, Taylor and Xavier; and brother, Craig.

Matthew J. Matthews, 66, died May 20, in Vienna, Va. Matthews received a bachelor’s degree from the University of Oregon and a master’s degree from the John Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies. He joined the Foreign Service in 1986 and served much of his career at posts in the Asia-Pacific region. He most recently served as ambassador to Brunei Darussalam, and prior to that, he was the deputy assistant secretary for Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands and, concurrently, the senior official for Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation. A member of the Senior Foreign Service, Matthews held numerous leadership roles during his more than 30 years with the Department. He is survived by his wife, Rachel; two children, Kristen and Daniel; and a granddaughter.


June 2020

Elvira “Vera” Barone, 85, died March 14, in Windham, N.H. Barone began her career with the Department of State in 1962 working in communications. During her career, Barone served at posts in Paris, Rome, London, Tehran, Grenada, Canada, Costa Rica, China, among others. She retired in 1994 and enjoyed adventures, such as hot air ballooning, traveling, or cruising on her pontoon boat. Barone is survived by her sister, Rose, and many nieces and nephews.

Carmen Pickett Catala, 67, died March 9, in Tucson, Ariz. Catala entered the Foreign Service in 2002 and served as a financial management officer at posts in Zambia, India, Mexico, the Dominican Republic, Thailand, and Colombia. She retired in 2017 and enjoyed traveling, and decorating. Catala is survived by her husband, Rick; a sister, Jennifer; and three children, Marina, Bettina, and Alexander.

Jerrold Mark Dion, 83, died Jan. 22, in Seattle, Wash. Dion graduated from the University of Minnesota and then received a Fulbright Scholarship at the University of Buenos Aires. He then attended Yale University, receiving his masters degree, and entered the Foreign Service in 1961. During his career, Dion served at posts in Lisbon, Kuala Lumpur, Medan, Asuncion, San Salvador, Rangoon, Lima, and Istanbul. He retired as a member of the Senior Foreign Service in 1996, and he taught international relations at Koc University in Istanbul for several years before officially retiring and moving to Seattle. Dion is survived by his brother, Francis; sister-in-law, Margaret; and two nieces and one nephew.

Robert Ray Gibbons,84, died March 19, in Mesa, Ariz. Gibbons began his Foreign Service career in 1966 serving in Baghdad. During his career, he served at posts in Caracas, Lima, Montevideo, Kaduna, Lahore, Guatemala City, Monterrey, Mexico City, and in Washington. He retired in 1994 and was active in serving missions with his church. Gibbons is survived by his wife of 61-years, Yvonne, and five children: Michael, Bryn, Kevin, Christopher, and Caryn.

Jay Kenneth Katzen, 83, died April 9, in Talkeetna, Alaska. After graduating from Princeton University and receiving a master’s degree from Yale University, Katzen entered the Foreign Service. During his career, he served at posts in Australia, Burundi, the Democratic Republic of Congo, the Republic of Congo, Romania, Mali, the United Nations, as well as at the White House. Outside of the Department, Katzen served as vice chairman of the African Development Foundation, acting chief of staff at the Peace Corps, visiting professor at Boston College’s Graduation School of Management, chairman of the Board of the Combat Wounded Veteran Challenge, and he served as a national park ranger. Katzen was also elected to four terms in the Virginia House of Delegates. He is survived by his wife of 56-years, Paddy; three sons, Timothy, David, and James; and seven grandchildren.

Paul Wesley Kriebel, 92, died March 2, in Glenview, Ill. Kriebel began his career with the Foreign Service in 1952 as a consul in Birmingham. From 1957-1961, he served in Ottawa followed by a tour in South Korea from 1967-1970. Kriebel served as deputy chief of mission in Nigeria from 1980-1982 and was chargé d’affaires to Gambia from 1982-1983. Kriebel retired from the Department in 1987 and enjoyed reading, nature, southwest Indian culture, and history. He is survived by wife, Marilynn, and four children: Linda, John, Paul, and Jeff.

Richard “Dick” Pond, 95, died Jan. 27, in Brooksville, Fla. Pond served in the U.S. Army during World War II as a cryptographer in London. In 1946, he joined the Foreign Service and served at posts in Washington, Copenhagen, London, Bonn, Frankfurt, Paris, Warsaw, Benghazi, Stockholm, and Salzburg. He retired from the Department in 1962, and he continued his work in foreign affairs at USAID, serving in Blantyre, Karachi, Hawaii, Saigon, Rio de Janeiro, Amman, and Kabul. Pond officially retired in 1974 and enjoyed playing bridge and cruising. Pond is survived by his wife of 44-years, Saundra; three sons, Eric, Peter, Jason; eight grandchildren; and four great grandchildren.

Avraham Rabby, 71, died April 17, in Tel Aviv, Israel. Rabby attended the University of Oxford and received an M.B.A. from the University of Chicago. In 1980, Rabby became an American citizen and served as a management consultant for Citibank. In 1989, he began his career with the Foreign Service. During his career, he served at posts in Europe, Africa, South America, and South Asia. He also served in Washington with the Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor Affairs, and at the U.S. Mission to the U.N. Rabby retired after 17-years with the Department and relocated to Israel. He was a lifelong activist on issues of equal rights and opportunities for individuals with disabilities. He enjoyed tandem bike tours and was an enthusiastic coin collector. Rabby is survived by his brother.

Edith Sabetay-Wilcox, 69, died Dec. 19, in Las Vegas, Nev. In her early career, Sabetay-Wilcox worked as a teacher at the University of Colorado and in Boulder public schools. She joined the Foreign Service with her husband George, a Foreign Service specialist, and together they served at posts in Singapore, Tashkent, São Paulo, Pretoria, Bahrain, and Bangkok. In Washington, she also worked at the American Foreign Service Association and worked with the homeless. Sabetay-Wilcox also enjoyed working as a freelance writer. She is survived by her husband, three children, and two granddaughters.

Katherine Marguerite White, 93, died March 12, in Phoenix, Ariz. White attended East Carolina University and began her career as an executive assistant in Continental Life, Gulf Oil, and Valley Bank (now Chase). She joined the Foreign Service in 1962 as a personnel assistant, and she later served as a personnel officer at posts in Tegucigalpa, Tokyo, Montevideo, Quito, Mexico City, Madrid, Kingston, and Brasilia. She also had several tours of duty in Washington, D.C., with the Bureau of Personnel (now the Bureau of Global Talent Management). White retired in 1985 and enjoyed playing golf and bridge, listening to opera, and spending time with family. She is survived by her brother, Irvin; one nephew and two nieces; and many grand nephews and nieces.


April 2020

Anthony Bishop, 59, died Jan. 20, in Cheverly, Md. Bishop served in the U.S. Navy at posts in Spain and Japan, and he served domestically as a reservist. He began his federal career as a fiscal technician within the Budget and Management Office at the Foreign Service Institute. During his career, Bishop also held the position as the longest-serving vice president of the American Federation of Government Employees Local 1534, a position that he was elected to six times. He retired from the Department of State in 2019 and enjoyed bowling, fishing, golfing, and traveling. Bishop is survived by his wife and Department employee, Pamela; four daughters, Chavonne, Corrie, Nakita, and Shelise; and eight grandchildren.

Richard C. Lundberg, 74, died Jan. 9, in Arlington, Va. Lundberg joined the Foreign Service in 1978 after working as a school teacher for nine years. He served in various positions at posts in Warsaw, Helsinki, Bucharest, Reykjavik, and Tallinn. At his last postings in Washington, he served as a program officer for the U.S. Speakers Program in Eastern Europe, an office director of the U.S. Society and Values Office in the Bureau of International Information Programs, a Congressional Pearson Fellow, and a career development officer within the former Bureau of Human Resources. Lundberg enjoyed cooking, music, animals, and photography. He is survived by his wife of almost 50 years, Ann.

Alan G. Mencher, 94, died Feb. 12, in Danbury, Conn. Mencher received degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Yale University, and University of California Los Angeles. He served in the U.S. Navy during World War II and worked briefly on the U.S. Space Program before joining the Foreign Service. Mencher spent 22 years at the Department of State as a scientific attaché. He was a visiting fellow at the London Business School and served as an independent consultant in the fields of technology, health, energy, and transportation. Mencher is survived by his wife of 55 years, Eve; five children, Paul, Justin, Pamela, Jessica, and Alexandra; and 10 grandchildren.

John G. Peters, 91, died Sept. 30, in Montgomery Village, Md. Peters joined the Foreign Service in 1956 after serving in the U.S. Army in Trieste, Italy. As a Foreign Service officer, Peters served at posts in Munich, Belgrade, Thessaloniki, Tel Aviv, and Hamburg. He held several posts in Washington, D.C., and one position in Bloomington, Ind. Peters retired in 1988 and worked briefly for the state of Maryland. In retirement, he enjoyed reading, gardening, performing arts, and classical music. Peters was predeceased by his wife, Anna. He is survived by two children, Michael and Mary; and three grandchildren.

Shackford “Shack” Pitcher, 84, died Jan. 23, in Arlington, Va. Pitcher began his federal career in 1962 at the Department of Agriculture. In 1980, he was commissioned as a Foreign Service officer and served at posts in Brazil, Lebanon, Syria, and Sweden. He retired in 1997 and enjoyed traveling, spending his summers in Aland, Finland. Pitcher is survived by his wife of 59 years, Birgitta; two children, Karen and John; and three grandchildren.

Joseph L. “Joe” Rinella Jr., 66, died Jan. 22, in Burlington, Vt. Rinella served in the U.S. Army as a telephone technician before joining the Foreign Service. He served at posts in Nairobi, Moscow, and Beirut before retiring in 2009. Rinella enjoyed renovating and remodeling homes and was a member of the Peru Lions Club, the Adirondack Mountain Club, and the American Legion. He is survived by his wife of 43 years, Evelyn; two daughters, Adrienne and Arlena; and two grandchildren.


March 2020

E. Marie Cheatham, 94, died Dec. 13, in Longview, Texas. Cheatham began her career as a Foreign Service secretary in 1952. She served at posts in Naples, Palermo, Rome, Cairo, Moscow, Bonn, Colombo, Adana, Prague, Recif, Lima, Valletta, and Nairobi before retiring in 1979. In retirement, Cheatham enjoyed the arts, photography, and traveling.

Walter Sheldon Clarke, 84, died Nov. 24, in Lutz, Fla. Clarke joined the Foreign Service in 1957 and served in the Bureau of Intelligence and Research. During his career, he served at posts in Lagos, Madrid, San Jose, Bogota, Bujumbura, and Abidjan. Clarke served as consul general in Douala, chargé d’affaires in Djibouti, and deputy chief of mission in Mogadishu. He also served as the Department advisor at the Naval War College, and at the Army College. He retired from the Senior Foreign Service in 1994, and served as an independent consultant, became a published author, and enjoyed teaching. He is survived by his wife of 46-years, Chantal; four children; 11 grandchildren; and a sister.

Wilson “Bill” N. Estell Jr., 74, died Nov. 28, in Vienna, Va. Estell joined the Foreign Service in 1978 and served at posts in Jeddah, Nairobi, Cairo, Washington, D.C., Addis Ababa, Beijing, Tokyo, Paris, and Bangkok before he retired in 2008. He is survived by his wife of 53 years, Emiko; three daughters, Catherine, Nancy, and Julie; and eight grandchildren.

Floyd Hagopian, 75, died Jan. 1, in Sebastian, Fla. Hagopian served in the U.S. Navy prior to joining the Foreign Service in the 1960s. Serving as an information management officer, Hagopian held posts in London, Djakarta, Moscow, Saigon, Bangui, Niamey, Bonn, Abidjan, Warrenton, Kinshasa, Pretoria, and Asmara. He retired in 1996 and continued another 15 years in the Foreign Service as an eligible family member in Mbabane, Asuncion, Lilongwe, Tokyo, Tashkent, Ouagadougou, and Yaounde in many different offices. In retirement, Hagopian enjoyed softball, tennis, darts, and was an avid card player. He is survived by his wife, Patti; two daughters; and two siblings.

Joseph Haratani, 96, died Dec. 6, in Sonora, Calif. Haratani served in the U.S. Army during World War II. He earned degrees at Stanford University and California State, prior to joining the Department of State as a sanitary engineer. He served in Latin America, Southeast Asia, and the Middle East. Haratani is survived by his wife, Amy-Ada; three sons, Guy, Richard, and Saji; two grandchildren; and three siblings.  

Dewey S. Holmes, 90, died Jan. 25, in Temple Hills, Md. Holmes served in the U.S. Air Force from 1951 to 1955, prior to being recruited by the Department of State. As a Foreign Service officer, Holmes served tours in the Congo, Japan, Ethiopia, Burundi, Iceland, Singapore, Nicaragua, Lebanon, and Burkina Faso. He retired in 1985 after 33 years of service. His greatest joys were teaching sunday school, playing golf, and cheering for the Dallas Cowboys. Holmes was predeceased by his wife, Odra. He is survived by a stepson, Norman; a daughter, Brenda; granddaughters; and great granddaughters.

Samuel Charles Keiter, 88, died Jan. 8, in Adamstown, Md. Following his graduation from Carleton College, Keiter spent a year in Denmark as a Fulbright Scholar. He then earned his masters from the School of Advanced International Studies, and in 1955–1956, he was a Ford Foundation Fellow based in Cairo. In 1957, Keiter joined the Foreign Service and served in north and central Africa, London, and Washington, D.C. He retired in 1986 and began his second career as an aviation consultant. In retirement, Keiter was active in the Maryland Continuing Care Residents Association. He is survived by his wife, Dolores; three children; seven grandchildren; and one great grandson.

Herbert Leo Tyson, 88, died Dec. 4, in Rockville, Md. Tyson served in the Korean War prior to joining the Peace Corps. Five years later, he joined the Foreign Service and served in posts in Nigeria, Mali, and Greece. He also served as a desk officer for several bureaus within the Department and served in the Inspector General’s office. In retirement, Tyson served as an election judge for Montgomery County in Md. and enjoyed art and music. He is survived by his wife of 63 years, Joyce; four children; and five grandchildren.


February 2020

James C. Clemons Jr., 93, died Oct. 7, in Bluffton, S.C. Clemons served in the U.S. Army during World War II and was later employed by U.S Forces in Vienna prior to joining the Foreign Service. Clemons served at posts in Palermo, Rome, Nicosia, Bonn, and Monrovia until he retired in 1979, when he was engaged by the VSE Corporation. Clemons enjoyed writing, poetry, acting, and community service. Clemons was predeceased by his wife, Gertrude and is survived by three children, Gary, Mike, and Karen. 

Richard Kinsella, 97, died Nov. 13, in West Hartford, Conn. Kinsella joined the U.S. Coast Guard and served with the Navy SEALS during the Korean War. He graduated from Georgetown University in 1955 and joined the Foreign Service working for the Office of Maritime Security. Kinsella served in Caracas until 1972 and then transferred to Rio de Janeiro where he remained until he retired in 1987. In retirement, Kinsella relocated to Wethersfield, Conn. He is survived by his wife of more than 60 years, Conchita; four children, Marco, Robert, John, and Dianne; six grandchildren; and one great-grandson. 

Benjamin F. Smith, 83, died Oct. 9, in Pawleys Island, S.C. Smith served in the U.S. Army reserves for six years prior to graduating from Auburn University. He worked at the Internal Revenue Service for 12 years and then joined the Department of State as a Foreign Service officer in the Office of the Inspector General. During his tenure, Smith traveled to 66 countries including a 3-year tour in Bogota. He retired in 1993 and enjoyed reading, gardening, cooking, and fishing. Smith was predeceased by a daughter, Joye. He is survived by his wife of 57 years, Ann; two daughters, Suzanne and Caroline; and four grandchildren. 

Katherine A. Sprang, 59, died Dec. 18, in Summerville, S.C. Sprang received a doctorate from Georgetown University in German Applied Linguistics/Second Language Acquisition. After serving in the private sector, she began her federal career as an assistant to the training coordinator/chief deputy clerk of the U.S. District Court in the Northern District of Texas. Sprang joined the Department in 2000 and served as associate dean of the Foreign Service Institute’s School of Professional and Area Studies, curriculum and evaluation coordinator in the Office of the Director, director of the Regional Training Program, and director of the Instructional Systems Division. She also headed up the Training Program in Charleston for the Financial Management Bureau. Sprang was an expert gardener and enjoyed home renovation. She is survived by her husband, John; a son, Alan; her mother, Clara; and three sisters. 


January 2020

Conrad Lawrence Bellamy, 85, died Oct. 19, in Baltimore, Md. Bellamy joined the U.S. Navy during the Korean War. He joined the Foreign Service in 1961 as a communications officer and along with his late first wife Eleanor and their two children, they served in the Dominican Republic, Belgium, the Sudan, Morocco, the Democratic Republic of Congo, and France. Bellamy also served in Jamaica and India. He retired in 1992 after 36 years of service. Bellamy is survived by his wife of 22 years, Lynn; two children, Lorenzo and Marguerite; one stepson, Leonard; two grandchildren; and one step-grandson.

Dorothy “Dottie” Bennetch, 77, died Sept. 19, in Woodbury, N.J. Bennetch joined the Department of State in 1960 and served at posts in Thailand, Japan, and South Africa. She retired in 2001 and enjoyed baseball and spending time with her family and her cat Mickey. Bennetch was predeceased by her parents; her sister Joanne; and her brother, Edward. She is survived by an aunt, Adelaide; a cousin, Peter; and several nieces and nephews.

James “Jim” Kenneth Connell, 79, died Sept. 28, in Arlington, Va. Following a tour in Kenya with the Peace Corps, Connell joined the Foreign Service in 1964. He served as deputy chief of mission and chargé d’affaires in Reykjavik, was counselor for Political-Military Affairs in Ankara, and also served as a political advisor to the U.S. and NATO Atlantic Commands and two chiefs of Naval Operations at the Pentagon. Throughout his career, Connell also served at posts at the U.N., Bucharest, Prague, Vienna, and Austria. In retirement, he enjoyed sports and remained involved and interested in international affairs. Connell is survived by his wife of 47 years, Pia; a sister, Judy; two children, Chris and Katherine; and two grandchildren.

Linda Jewell, 66, died Nov. 18, in Washington, D.C. Jewell began her career with the Department in 1976. She served in cultural and information roles at posts in Jakarta, Mexico City, New Delhi, and Warsaw. In Washington, D.C., she served as a desk officer for Mexico and Central America and as deputy director and director for the Bureau of Western Hemisphere Affairs (WHA). Jewell also held positions as deputy chief of mission in San Jose, chief of policy planning in WHA, deputy assistant secretary of state for Canada and Mexico, and from 2005–2008 she served as ambassador to Ecuador. In retirement, she was active in promoting U.S. public diplomacy through various organizations and she loved to travel. Jewell is survived by her husband of 43 years and retired Foreign Service officer, John; and two children, Susanna and Patrick.

Delvin W. Junker, 84, died May 22, in Plantation, Fla. Junker joined the U.S. Army in 1957, then served in the U.S. Navy during the Vietnam War. He retired from the Navy in 1979, and in 1981, he joined the Department of State as a Foreign Service officer where he served in Mexico, Ecuador, Nicaragua, Honduras, and Spain. Junker retired and returned to work part-time as a reemployed annuitant in Mongolia, Ireland, and Haiti. He was predeceased by two children, Rebecca and Mark. Junker is survived by his wife, Betty; and two stepsons, Patrick and George.

Daniel F. Keller, 71, died Nov. 5, in Austin, Texas. Keller served as a Foreign Service officer at posts in Mexico, Japan, China, Chile, Venezuela, the Philippines, Spain, Russia, and Nigeria. He retired in 2012 and was an active volunteer, was president of the Seneca Rotary Club and the Seneca Newcomers Club. In retirement he also enjoyed golfing, boating, fishing, bridge, and square dancing. Keller is survived by his wife, Mingchen; three children, Angela, Aimee, and Andrew; and three grandchildren.

Robert “Bob” Reilly Strand, 83, died June 20, in Baltimore, Md. Strand joined the Foreign Service after basic training in the U.S. Army in 1961. He served at posts in Guinea, Enugu, Eastern Nigeria, Zaire, and Moscow. He then worked for the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency in Belgrade, and was assigned for three years to the U.S. Mission in Belgrade. Strand also served as acting director in the Bureau of Political-Military Affairs. He retired in 1986 but continued to serve as a reviewer in the Freedom of Information Act Office until 2016. In retirement he enjoyed spending time with his grandchildren, hiking, literature, and opera. He is survived by two children, Stratton and Ashley.

Thomas J. Wajda, 78, died Oct. 15, in Frederick, Md. Wajda joined the Foreign Service in 1963 after receiving a bachelor’s degree from Youngstown State University. He served as a refugee advisor in the Tay Ninh Province during the Vietnam War, and served at posts in Iran, Afghanistan, Senegal, New Zealand, France, and Canada. Wajda retired in 1995, and with his wife, founded Willow Pond Farm, an herb and lavender farm in Fairfield, Pa., where he grew more than 100 varieties of lavender and founded the PA Lavender Festival. Wajda is survived by his wife of 58 years, Madeline; three children, Rebecca, Thomas, and Amy; and five grandchildren.

Frontis “Wig” B. Wiggins Jr., 90, died Oct. 29, in Arlington, Va. Wiggins served in the U.S. Navy during the Korean War. He joined the Foreign Service in 1953 and served as consul general in Brisbane, deputy chief of mission in Valletta, head of the board of examiners, deputy director general, and served in positions at posts in Guatemala City, Nairobi, Jakarta, and Rome. Wiggins retired after 38 years of service in 1991. In retirement he became an internationally recognized expert on Bing Crosby—publishing discography, interviews, and written works. Wiggins was predeceased by his wife and Foreign Service specialist, Laura. He is survived by a brother, James; two children, Frontis III and Joanne; and a grandson.


November 2019

Barbara L. Dorset, 89, died Aug. 6, in Sarasota, Fla. Dorset began her career with the U.S. Army at the Pentagon and then worked at the CIA. With the United States Information Agency she was posted in Bonn and Rabat prior to serving the Department as a Foreign Service specialist in Valletta. Dorset then accompanied her husband, a Foreign Service officer, on tours in Accra, Monrovia and Bonn. Dorset retired after 22 years of service in 1983 and worked for several years at a law office just outside Washington, D.C. She loved to read and write and enjoyed puzzles. Dorset is survived by a son, Mark.

Theodore “Ted” Lyman Eliot Jr., 91, died Aug. 9, in Sonoma, Calif. In 1948, Eliot attended Harvard University and received his master’s degree from Harvard’s Graduate School of Public Administration in 1956. He became a Foreign Service officer in 1950 and was posted in Sri Lanka, Germany, the USSR, Iran and Washington, D.C. Eliot served as ambassador to Afghanistan from 1973-1978. He retired after 29 years of service and worked as the dean of the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy and director of the Asia Foundation’s Center for Asian-Pacific Affairs. Eliot was an avid bird watcher and loved baseball. He was predeceased by his wife of 65 years, Patricia. Eliot is survived by four children, Sally, Ted, Wendy and Peter; two sisters, Joan and Mary; nine grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.

Norbert “Bud” Holz, 98, died Aug. 30, in Cambridge, Wis. Holz served in World War II and earned four campaign medals and seven battle stars. After the war, he graduated from college and served as a teacher until he joined the Foreign Service in 1962, where he served with his family in Ecuador. Holz also served at posts in Paraguay, Guatemala and Panama, and he served as chief of human resources in Vietnam. He retired in 1978 and moved to Fort Atkinson, Wis. Holz was predeceased by his wife of 72 years, Lydia. He is survived by three children, Kathy, Chris and John; eight grandchildren; and 10 great-grandchildren.

Rodney Charles Johnson, 87, died July 29, in Sheboygan, Wis. Johnson joined the Foreign Service in 1980 as assistant medical director for the Clinical Psychiatry office. In this position, Johnson participated in the debriefing of the American hostages when they were released by Iran in 1981. He was also posted to Mexico City for three years, serving South and Central America and the Caribbean. In retirement, Johnson spent summers on Detroit Island in northern Lake Michigan where he docked his 72-foot sailboat, the Barlovento. Johnson is survived by his wife, Dolcye; three children, Kirt, Kirstin and Kristian; and three grandchildren.

David Taylor Jones, 77, died Aug. 6, in Philadelphia, Pa. Jones received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Pennsylvania prior to serving in the U.S. Army’s intelligence branch as a second lieutenant in Korea. In 1966, he left active duty—remaining in the Army Reserve—and entered the Foreign Service. Jones served as the special assistant during the Intermediate Nuclear Forces (INF) treaty negotiation and ratification, deputy director of the INF Ratification task force and after being promoted to the Senior Foreign Service, he served as the Foreign Affairs advisor to two Army chiefs of staff from 1989-1992. Jones served his final assignment as the political minister counselor in Ottawa. He retired after 34 years of service and enjoyed a second career as a writer and editor. Jones is survived by his wife Teresa; a sister, Elizabeth; three daughters, Martha, Lisa and Margaret; and two grandsons.

Walter Alexander Kohl, 97, died Aug. 10, in Bethesda, Md. Kohl served as the Voice of America diplomatic correspondent and worked closely with Secretaries of State William Rogers and Henry Kissinger as they traveled in Asia, Africa, the Middle East and Europe. He served as an American press attaché in Germany, an information officer in Greece, a public affairs counselor in Vienna and director of the United States Information Agency’s Foreign Press centers in Washington, New York and Los Angeles. Kohl retired from the Senior Foreign Service and went on to direct the Voice of America German language broadcast operation. In retirement, he also established the Washington-based international communications firm Inter-Intel-Info Inc. Kohl is survived by a son, Thomas.

Lowell Bruce Laingen, 96, died July 15, in Bethesda, Md. Laingen served as a naval officer in the South Pacific during World War II. He graduated from St. Olaf College in Minnesota and later received an M.A. from the University of Minnesota and an honorary Ph.D. from the Humphrey Institute. He joined the Foreign Service in 1949 and served at posts in Germany, Iran, Pakistan and Afghanistan, and he was appointed ambassador to Malta in 1977. In 1979 he was appointed charge d’affaires to Iran and was taken hostage, where he remained in captivity for 444 days. After his release, he was appointed vice president of the National Defense University where he served until retired in 1987 after 38 years of service. Laingen is survived by his wife of 62 years, Penelope; a sister, Norma; three sons, William, Charles and James; 10 grandchildren; seven great-grandchildren; and two great-great-grandchildren.

Dorothy Grace Schwertfeger, 96, died Sept. 27 in Horicon, Wis. Schwertfeger joined the Department of State in 1941 and served as a Foreign Service officer for more than six decades at assignments throughout Europe, Asia and Africa. During the evacuation of Cambodia in 1975, Schwertfeger and the ambassador were among the last of embassy officials to be helicoptered out of the country before diplomatic relations were severed between the two countries. In the 1990s, Schwertfeger served in Washington, D.C., until she retired, coming out of retirement to offer assistance during the second Iraq War. Schwertfeger was predeceased by her parents; three siblings; and a niece. She is survived by a sister, Selma; and many nieces and nephews.

Marsha Lynne Singer, 62, died April 28, in Arlington, Va. Singer received a B.A. and a J.D. from the University of Florida and an LL.M. from the University of Miami. She began her Foreign Service career as an employee family member, accompanying her Foreign Service officer husband, David Grier, at assignment in Caracas. Singer became a Foreign Service officer in 2001, and she served as a consular officer in Krakow, a desk officer in the Bureau of European and Eurasian Affairs, a desk officer in the Bureau of Western Hemisphere, a PEPFAR coordinator in South Africa and an economic officer in Caracas. Singer was an avid reader, gardener, bird watcher, pet lover and fan of cooking shows. She is survived by her husband; a son, Matthew; her mother, Ruth; two siblings, Sara and William; three nieces and two nephews.

Rosalind “Roddy” Sawyer Springsteen, died Sept. 6, in Washington, D.C. Springsteen attended Oberlin College and received her master’s degree from the University of Michigan. In 1949, she joined the Ford Motor Company as their first professional female employee. In 1950, she joined the Department of State as an economist and served in positions in the Far Eastern Research Division and the Office of European Regional Affairs. Springsteen served alongside her husband and Department employee, George, until 1958 when she left in order to adopt their first child. After raising her children for 12 years, Springsteen served positions in a library, as a middle school teacher, as an economic editor at the Department of Labor and as managing editor of the “Journal of Economic Education” from which she retired in 2009. In retirement she enjoyed gardening and sports. Springsteen was predeceased by her husband. She is survived by two children, George and Martha—a former Department employee; and five grandchildren.

Frederick H. Stein, 92, died July 26, in Dumfries, Va. Stein served in the U.S. Army from 1945-1946. He received a bachelor’s degree from City College of New York and attended SRT, one of the first TV schools in the country. Stein began his career in 1955 as a civil servant with the United States Information Agency and later converted to the Foreign Service. He worked as a producer, director, writer and division chief. Stein traveled throughout Latin America, Africa, Asia, Europe and the United States. He retired from the Foreign Service in 1985 and was active in the National Active and Retired Federal Employees Association, and he also enjoyed playwriting, directing, Tai Chi, model trains and walking. Stein was predeceased by his wife, Gloria. He is survived by two children, Stuart and Susan; and a daughter-in-law, Danielle.


October 2019

James F. Anderson, 98, died July 10, in McLean, Va. Anderson served in the U.S. Army Air Corps as a captain and navigator during World War II. He later joined the Department of State as a public affairs officer and served at posts in Vietnam, Libya, Korea, Indonesia, Penang, Australia and New Zealand. Anderson retired after 30 years of service in 1980 and enjoyed reading, the arts and traveling with his wife of 63 years, Helen. Anderson was predeceased by his wife. He is survived by three children, Jim, Phil and Sheila; six grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren.

Robert “Ted” Theodore Curran, 87, died July 10, in Traverse City, Mich. Curran graduated from Haverford College and received an M.A. from Columbia University. In 1955, he joined the Foreign Service as a public affairs officer and served at posts in Washington, D.C., Germany, Lebanon, Jordan, Yemen, Mexico, Afghanistan and Morocco. After retiring as a career minister in 1984, Curran joined the executive team of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty and held positions as president of Springfield College, president of the Foreign Policy Association and executive director of the American Institute for Foreign Study Foundation. He also served on numerous boards that focused on education and environmental issues. Curran is survived by his wife, Marcia; and two daughters, Sara and Diana.

Cari Robin Enav, 58, died July 3, in Loudon County, Va. A graduate of Cornell University, Enav received her master’s degree from Arizona State University. She joined the Foreign Service in 1991 and served at posts in Ciudad Juarez, Tel Aviv, Beijing and Lisbon. In Washington, D.C., Enav served numerous leadership assignments and attended the National War College. Most recently, she served as an office director in the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement and the director for cultural preservation in the Bureau of Education and Cultural Affairs. Enav is survived by her husband Doron; and four children, Eli, Gil, Emma and Tali.

P. Joyce Gunn, 79, died July 8, in Houston, Texas. Gunn served in the U.S. Naval Reserves until 1969. She began her career with the Department of State at the Los Angeles Passport Agency. She transferred to Washington, D.C., and served in the Washington Passport Agency as assistant director and as assistant chief of the European Division in the Citizens Emergency Center until 1986. Gunn later served as regional director of the New Orleans Passport Agency and the Houston Passport Agency until her retirement in 2002. Gunn is survived by a sister, Hazel; her lifelong partner, William; and two nieces.

Robert A. Martin, 87, died July 22, in Menlo Park, Calif. Martin graduated from Yale University in 1954 and was drafted to the U.S. Army Intelligence in Germany. He later attended law school at the University of Pennsylvania and in 1959, Martin began his career as a Foreign Service officer. Martin served in positions primarily working on arms control and national security issues in Geneva, Paris and Brussels, Saigon, Moscow, Tehran and Frankfurt, as well as in the Bureau of Intelligence and Research in Washington, D.C. Martin retired as a senior Foreign Service officer after 35 years of service. In retirement, he was active in many local volunteer activities and enjoyed traveling. Martin is survived by his wife and retired Foreign Service officer, Joanna.

John W. McDonald, 97, died May 17, in Arlington, Va. McDonald joined the Foreign Service in 1949 and held positions throughout Western Europe and the Middle East. He served as deputy director-general of the U.N.’s International Labour Organization and was appointed an ambassador on four occasions by two different presidents. In 1983, McDonald joined the Department’s Center for the Study of Foreign Affairs as coordinator for multilateral affairs. He retired in 1987 and became a professor of law at the George Washington University, in addition to cofounding the Institute for Multi-Track Diplomacy, which he led until 2017. McDonald was nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize in 1994 and was an avid fencer. He was predeceased by two children, Kathleen and Jim. He is survived by his wife of 48 years, Christel; two daughters, Lynn and Laura; four grandchildren; and six great-grandchildren.

Oliver Charles Shaw, 85, died on Aug. 3, in Albuquerque, N.M. Shaw served in the U.S. Army’s 82nd Airborne Division before entering the Foreign Service in 1961. He served as a communicator in Rangoon, Guatemala City, Brussels, Asuncion and Djakarta. Shaw also served as a budget and fiscal officer in Tehran, Tokyo, Nairobi, Cairo, La Paz, Kuala Lumpur and Hong Kong. He retired from the Foreign Service in 1991. Shaw was predeceased by a son, Patrick. He is survived by his wife, Janet; a daughter; and three granddaughters.

Jean Marie Heywood Tueller, 89, died Aug. 14, in Lehi, Utah. An employee family member, Tueller and her husband, Blaine, a Foreign Service officer, spent 30 years traveling on assignments in Dublin, Vienna, Tangier, Caracas, Panama City, Manila and Madrid. Tueller and her husband retired to Utah and presided over the Greece Athens Mission with their church, traveling to Turkey, Albania, Cyprus, Jordan and Egypt. Tueller is survived by her husband; 10 children, Jan, Anna, Matthew—also a Foreign Service officer—Marie, Diane, Martha, Elisabeth, James, Rachel and Jeanne; 30 grandchildren; 19 great-grandchildren; and two sisters.

Michael Masahiko Uyehara, 64, died Jan. 10, in Fairfax, Va. Uyehara served in the U.S. Army for eight years, both enlisted and as an officer. He joined the Foreign Service in 1986 and served in London, Belfast, Manila, Washington, Yokohama, Tokyo, Kyiv, Baghdad, Vienna and Belgrade. Uyehara retired in 2018. He is survived by his wife, Foreign Service Officer Margaret; and five children, Andrew, Leilani, Ryan, Christopher and Malia.

George Roney Younts Jr., 87, died July 3, in Loudoun County, Va. Younts was in the U.S. Air Force for four years prior to attending Texas A&M University where he earned his engineering degree. He then attended George Washington University and earned his master’s degree in political science. He worked as a Foreign Service officer and was posted in Germany and Israel before retiring in 1983. Younts was predeceased by two children, Vicki and George. He is survived by his wife of 64 years, Patricia; a son, John; three grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren.


September 2019

John Toscan Bennett, 90, died June 16, in Alexandria, Va. Bennett attended Harvard University and earned a Ph.D. from the University of California before joining the Foreign Service in 1955. He served in Tunisia, Curacao, twice in Vietnam, the Dominican Republic, South Korea and Washington, with a final posting as deputy chief of mission in Guatemala. Bennett also attended Stanford University’s Sloan Program and served as chairman of the Department of International Studies at the National War College before retiring in 1981. In retirement, Bennett founded the Korea Economic Institute in Washington, D.C., and taught at George Washington University. Bennett was predeceased by a daughter, Holly. He is survived by his wife of 65 years, Maria; two children, Kim and Toscan; and seven grandchildren.

Eugene “Gene” Hall Bird, 94, died June 2, in Vancouver, Wash. Bird served in the U.S. Navy from 1944-1948 before receiving bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Oregon. He joined the Foreign Service in 1953 and was posted to Jerusalem shortly before the 1956 war. Bird also served in Beirut, Cairo, Dhahran, Jeddah and India. He retired in 1975 and moved to Washington, with his wife, Jerri, where together they spent decades advocating for a “two-state” peace settlement of the Arab-Israeli conflict. Bird is predeceased by his wife. He is survived by four children, Christina, Nancy, Shelly and Kai.

Richard Birn, 88, died March 23, in Bethesda, Md. Birn received a bachelor’s degree from Yale University and pursued doctoral studies at Columbia University, where he received his master’s degree in 1955. He studied under a Fulbright fellowship in Paris, and worked as a teacher prior to joining the Foreign Service in 1962. Birn served at posts in Helsinki, Hong Kong, Toronto, Malta and Mexico City. His final posting was as a policy officer in Washington, before he retired in 1987. In retirement, Birn worked as a substitute teacher and was active in numerous organizations such as DACOR. Birn is survived by his wife of 61 years, Jacqueline; two children, Daniel and Anne-Emanuelle; and one grandchild.

Jeffrey A. Brock, 73, died June 6, in Myrtle Beach, S.C. Brock served 20 years in the U.S. Navy Seabees, retiring as a petty chief officer. He joined the Foreign Service in 2001 and served as a facilities manager in Almaty and Buenos Aires. He spent the latter part of his career working at assignments in Africa and South America. Brock retired in 2015 and had a life-long love of golf. He prided his achievement of three holes-in-one while playing a par-4 course in Islamabad, Pakistan. Brock is survived by his wife of 30 years, Joy; a sister-in-law, Priscilla; and a niece, JJ.

Robert “Bob” John Clarke, 72, died May 30, in Rockville, Md. Clarke served in the U.S. Army from 1968-1970. He began his Foreign Service career as a consular and political officer in Managua, Nicaragua. Clarke served as special assistant to Secretary of State George Shultz and served tours in Madrid, Athens, Manila, Bangkok, Kabul and Hermosillo among other positions. He served his final tour as deputy chief of mission in Wellington, New Zealand, then retired after 33 years of service. Clarke is survived by his wife, Rosalind; and two daughters, Lisa and Jill.

John Gunther Dean, 93, died June 6, in Paris, France. Dean served in the U.S. Army during World War II. He received a B.S. and an M.A. from Harvard University and a doctorate in law from the Sorbonne. Dean’s Foreign Service career began in 1956 when he served as a political officer in Vientiane, Laos. He helped to open the first American Consulates in Lomé, Togo, and Bamako, Mali. From 1972-1974 he was the deputy chief of mission and chargé d’affaires in Vientiane, where he is credited for having helped the establishment of a coalition government which saved thousands of lives after the Fall of Saigon in 1975. From 1974-1988, he served as ambassador to Khmer Republic, Denmark, Lebanon, Thailand and India. He retired from the Foreign Service in 1989. He is survived by his wife, Martine; three children; and seven grandchildren.

Pasquale “Pat” DiTanna, 87, died July 18, in Fairfax, Va. DiTanna attended the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania in 1953 prior to joining the U.S. Army. He served one year in Korea prior to joining the Foreign Service in 1956. DiTanna served in Washington, the Philippines, Turkey, Colombia, Panama, Ceylon, Chile, Switzerland and Pakistan. He also traveled extensively during assignments for the Office of Foreign Building Operations. DiTanna retired after 32 years of service. He enjoyed volunteering and was an active member of the Sons of Italy and Veterans of Foreign Wars in Fairfax, Va. DiTanna is survived by his wife of 59 years, Janet; a sister, Martha; four children, Tom, Lucian, Angela and Helen; and six grandchildren.

Joe W. Ellis, 70, died June 15, in Woodbridge, Va. Ellis served in the U.S. Army until he joined the Department of State in 1992. He served as a telecommunications specialist until he retired in 2012, and then he returned to the Department to serve as a contractor. Ellis was a fan of the Philadelphia Eagles. He is survived by his wife, Esther; three children, Maurice, Byron and Valda; seven grandchildren; a great-grandson; and five siblings.

James Eugene Leader, 83, died May 29, in Ashburn, Va. Leader graduated from Purdue University and studied abroad in Allahabad, India, planting the seed for his lifelong love of South Asia. He joined the Foreign Service in 1960 and served in India, England, Sri Lanka and Venezuela. He retired after 27 years of service in 1987. Leader was active as a volunteer scoutmaster with the Boy Scouts of America, Troop 345. He was predeceased by his wife, Carillon. He is survived by three children, Daniel, Carol and Jane; 11 grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren.

Duncan H. MacInnes, 71, died April 22, in Sarasota, Fla. MacInnes attended Clark University and received an M.A. degree from the University of Arizona. He entered the Foreign Service in 1984 and served in Doha, Sanaa, Colombo, Jerusalem, Canberra and Washington. He retired as a member of the Senior Foreign Service in 2012 and pursued interests in photography, travel and boating. MacInnes is survived by his wife of 50 years, Donna; and son, Robert.

George A. McFarland Jr., 88, died June 1, in Annapolis, Md. McFarland served as a U.S. Air Force pilot during the Korean War. He joined the Foreign Service in 1958 as a political officer and served in Costa Rica, Cyprus, Turkey, Peru, Brazil, and Antigua and Barbuda. He retired to Peru in 1985 and became a modernist sculptor, exhibiting in Texas, Maryland and Washington. McFarland is survived by his wife, Rosario; four children, Stephen, Anne, Maria and John; and seven grandchildren.

Donna Lee Millet, 63, died May 13, in Lakewood, Colo. Millet joined the Foreign Service in 1980, and she served as a secretary in New Delhi and Tunis, where she met her husband, Jean-Paul “Paulo.” Millet then served as an office management specialist in Nouakchott, Algiers, Djibouti, Colombo, Libreville, Abu Dhabi, Damascus, Pretoria, Kuwait City and Canberra. She retired in 2011 and moved to Loveland, Colo., where she enjoyed an active life and enjoyed traveling in both the U.S. and Europe. Millet is survived by her husband.

Neala D. Montgomery, 66, died March 8, in Lawton, Okla. Montgomery joined the Foreign Service in 1989 and served as an office management specialist and diplomatic courier for more than 25 years. She served at posts in Budapest, San Jose, Costa Rica, Manila, Nairobi—during the 1998 bombing—Prague, Caracas, Washington, Frankfurt, and Bangkok before she retired in 2014. In retirement, Montgomery lived in California and was an avid gardener and also enjoyed traveling and volunteering. She is survived by her husband, also a retired Foreign Service officer, Steven; and a daughter, Candice.

Department of State Seal

Thomas A. Rodgers, 78, died June 9, in Tucson, Ariz. Rodgers served in the U.S. Navy and worked as a psychiatrist at Balboa Naval Hospital in San Diego. He joined the Foreign Service in 1988 and served as a MED regional psychiatrist. He served in Kinshasa, Pretoria, Bangkok and Santiago. He left the Department of State in 1995 and continued working as a psychiatrist in Alaska and Spokane, Washington, until he retired in 2010. Rodgers enjoyed storytelling and fishing. He is survived by his wife, Hester; many children; and grandchildren.

Arlette A. Sulak, 84, died June 27, in Lake Ridge, Va. Sulak entered the civil service in 1989. She served alongside her husband as a personal services contractor on assignments in Ghana, Germany and Pakistan. She also served as a civil service employee on their last assignment in Vienna, Austria. Sulak retired in 2004 and enjoyed gardening. She is survived by her husband, Michael; and two sons, Michael and Andrew. 

Lucy Giampiccolo Silverthorne, 95, died April 24, in El Paso, Texas. Silverthorne entered the Foreign Service in 1955 and served in Washington, as secretary to the assistant secretary for far eastern economic affairs. She was later assigned as secretary to the ambassador at posts in Tegucigalpa, San Jose, Caracas and Rome. She later became a consular officer and served in Panama, Juarez, Caracas, Washington, Miami and Managua before retiring in 1976 to El Paso. Silverthorne was predeceased by her husband, Joseph. She is survived by two sons, Pancho and Joseph; and three grandchildren.


July/August 2019

William George Barraclough, 84, died April 22, in Hilton Head Island, S.C. Barraclough served in the U.S. Navy and the Peace Corps before joining the Foreign Service in 1963. During his career, he served as the deputy assistant secretary for trade policy, chief negotiator for the first U.S.-China trade treaty, economic minister to Japan, deputy chief of mission to the EU in Brussels and deputy chief of mission in Paris. After 26 years in the Foreign Service and five years as CEO of the People to People International exchange programs based in Kansas City, Barraclough retired and volunteered his knowledge through various foreign affairs organizations. Barraclough is survived by two children, Keith and Jennifer; a granddaughter; and a great-granddaughter.

Maxine Joan Bradrick, 85, died March 2, in Bakersfield, Calif. Bradrick joined the Foreign Service in 1967 and served as a registered nurse in Bamako, Mali, and Accra, Ghana. She enjoyed reaching out to local professionals in each community and building bridges through medical needs. In 1992, Bradrick retired and enjoyed traveling and spending time with family and friends. She is survived by her sister, Verna.

Barbara “Genny” Jean Brenner, 80, died April 14, in Ocala, Fla. A member of the Foreign Service, Brenner served as secretary to the ambassador in London, England. She also served in various positions in Italy, Israel, Jamaica and Washington, D.C. She retired in 2003 and enjoyed reading, traveling, and playing cards and trivia. Brenner is survived by a daughter, Kimberly.

Virginia A. Crawford, 72, died March 6, in Yardley, Pa. Crawford joined the Foreign Service in 1970 and spent four decades working overseas in Vientiane, Vienna, Moscow, Bonn, Athens, Abu Dhabi, Jakarta, Singapore, Tokyo and Paris. She retired in 2008 and enjoyed reading, traveling, taking classes at the University of Alabama and spending time with family and friends. Crawford was predeceased by her husband Francis. She is survived by a stepdaughter; three step-grandchildren; and many nieces and nephews.

Faye E. Dunn, 94, died April 11, in Tavares, Fla. Dunn served in the U.S. Naval Reserve during World War II. She entered the Foreign Service in 1951 and served at posts in Buenos Aires, Tripoli, Manila, Freetown, Rome, Seoul, Kinshasa, Kuala Lumpur, Rangoon, Pretoria and in the Bureau of African Affairs in Washington, D.C. Dunn retired in 1975 and was active in golfing, boating and volunteering with Habitat for Humanity. Dunn is survived by a niece, Linda.

Fredric A. Emmert, 73, died Nov. 10, 2018, in Washington, D.C. Emmert joined the Foreign Service in 1970. His career included assignments in La Paz, Salvador, Santiago, Mexico City, Athens, Bogota, Brussels and Rio de Janeiro. While at the Department, Emmert authored a three-part series called “U.S. Media in the 90’s” which was translated into four languages and featured on the Department’s website for more than 10 years. He retired in 1996 and continued working in public affairs for several telecommunications companies until 2017. Emmert is survived by his wife of 39 years, Deborah; and a son, Alexander.  

John “Jack” P. Felt, 74, died April 5, in Annapolis, Md. Felt was an officer in the U.S. Navy from 1968-1972 and served in Vietnam. He worked in the private sector in New York and Iran before joining the Foreign Service in 1976. Felt served as an economic officer with overseas postings in Kenya, Mexico, Canada, Nigeria and Greece. He achieved status as a Senior Foreign Service officer, and after his retirement in 2004, he wrote two books on genealogy and family history. Felt is survived by two children, Emily and Justin; and three grandchildren.

Donna Jean Hamilton, 74, died May 16, in Davis, Calif. Hamilton entered the Foreign Service in 1970 and served her first tour in Bogota, Colombia. She met her husband at their A-100 class and together they served in Mexico City, Thessaloniki, Lima, San Jose, Guatemala City and Washington, D.C. Hamilton’s last position, before retiring in 2001, was as principal deputy assistant secretary for the Bureau of Consular Affairs. In retirement, she served as the president of the Olympia World Affairs Council and was a member of the Advisory Board of the Washington State University Honors College. Hamilton is survived by her husband, John; two daughters, Kathryn and Erin; three grandchildren; and a sister.

William “Mac” McKinley Johnson Jr., 98, died April 8, in Washington, D.C. After graduating from Princeton University and the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Johnson served in the U.S. Navy during World War II. In 1950, he joined the Foreign Service and served in Germany, Morocco, South Africa and Canada. He served as the U.S. minister to Canada from 1973-1976 and consul general in Johannesburg from 1976-1980. Johnson retired from the Foreign Service in 1980 but continued to work for the Department until 1995. In retirement, he chaired a Civil War Roundtable and co-captained an intercontinental U.S.-U.K. golf group. Johnson is predeceased by his first wife, Margaret, and his second wife, Anne. He is survived by three children, Valentine, Christopher and Priscilla; two stepdaughters, Jane and Molly; and nine grandchildren.

Terry Leon Kopf, 80, died Jan. 19, in Huddleston, Va. Kopf served in the U.S. Air Force from 1959-1963. He then joined the Foreign Service as a communications officer in 1965. Kopf was posted to Rio de Janeiro, Saigon, Geneva, Taipei, Sofia, The Hague and Mogadishu. He also served temporary post assignments in Helsinki, Beijing and Tehran. He retired in 1989. Kopf is survived by his wife, Elaine; a son, Kevin; a granddaughter; and many nieces and nephews.

Christopher Jay Milam, 58, died April 23, in San Antonio, Texas. Milam served in the U.S. Air Force, then performed various law enforcement duties in Texas ranging from local patrol officer to lead investigator on a state counter-narcotics task force. Milam joined the Department in 2009 as an export control and border security advisor for Kosovo and Croatia. He also served in this role for Serbia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Albania and Montenegro. Milam is survived by his wife, Ljiljana; mother, Daneen; three children, Kymberly, Christopher and James; one sister; two brothers; and three grandchildren.

Elcira Hurtado Pruitt, 82, died April 22, in Potomac, Md. An employee family member, Pruitt traveled with her husband, a Foreign Service officer, to posts in Kinshasa, Brasilia and Mexico City. She was best known for her decorating and hostess skills. Pruitt is survived by her husband, Louis; a daughter, Monica; and two grandchildren.

Brynhild “Brynnie” C. Rowberg, 101, died May 17, in Northfield, Minn. Rowberg moved to Washington, D.C., in 1941 to work for the Department. She entered the Foreign Service in 1945 and was appointed to the London staff of the Office of the Political Advisor to the commanding general for Austria. Throughout her career, Rowberg served in posts in London, Florence, Verona, Salzburg, Vienna, Prague, Athens, Saigon, Bremen, Korea and Taipei. She retired from the Foreign Service in 1973. In retirement, she was active in the League of Women Voters, the Minnesota Historical Society and her church. Rowberg is survived by several cousins.

Catherine (Kay) Ellen Ward, 97, died March 12. Ward served as a Foreign Service secretary from 1975-1985. She was posted in Sri Lanka, Riyadh, Malta, Dhahran and Beijing before her retirement at age 65. In retirement, Ward spent 13 years in Sacramento to be close to her daughter, Kathy, and enjoyed spending time with her grand-doggie, Daisy. Ward is survived by three children, Kathy, Joe and Rob.


June 2019

David Bloch, 80, died April 14, in Washington, D.C. Bloch served in the U.S. Army and the Peace Corps prior to joining the Department of State in 1968. As a political and consular officer, Bloch served in Guatemala, Turkey, Afghanistan, Sicily and Brazil. He retired from the Foreign Service in 1993 but maintained a working association with the Department until 2014. Bloch enjoyed traveling, reading and cultural pursuits. He is survived by his wife of 52 years, Barbara; and a sister, Benita. 

Gladys Boluda, 59, died April 25, in Annapolis, Md. In 1962, when she was two years old, Boluda immigrated with her family to the United States from Cuba. She later attended the University of Maryland, and in 1980 began working for the Department of State as a clerk typist. Boluda became a Foreign Affairs officer in 1988 and served at the Department for more than 39 years, 25 of which she spent in the Bureau of European and Eurasian Affairs. Most recently she served as assistant chief of protocol for diplomatic affairs in the Office of the Chief of Protocol. Boluda is predeceased by her father Miguel. She is survived by her mother, Gladys; her husband, Michael; and a daughter, Alexandra.

Richard “Dick” Cutler Perkinson, 75, died Feb. 23, in Arlington, Va. Perkinson served as a Green Beret in the U.S. Army during the Vietnam War, for which he was awarded a Bronze Star for Valor, two Purple Hearts and the Silver Star. He later earned his undergraduate and graduate degrees at Boston University. Perkinson entered public service with the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection and enjoyed a successful career in computer science. He joined the Department of State in 2011. He enjoyed reading science-fiction novels, fishing and spending time with his family in the outdoors. Perkinson is survived by his wife of 28 years, Diane; a sister, Joan; four children, David, Stephanie, Abigail and Debra; and nine grandchildren.

Lisa Kay Harshbarger, 59, died March 24, in Stuart, Fla. A graduate of Manchester College, Harshbarger received a master’s degree and a doctorate from Indiana University. In 1985, she taught writing and speaking skills in Kuala Lumpur, a job that led her to accept two Fulbright junior lecturer positions, an English language fellow assignment and eventually led her to join the Foreign Service as a regional English language officer in 2001. Harshbarger served in Washington, D.C., Uzbekistan, Ukraine, Hungary, the Philippines and the English Language Program Office at the Foreign Service Institute prior to her retirement in 2013. In retirement, she enjoyed reading and traveling. Harshbarger is survived by her husband, Jasmir; a son, Haris; her parents, Richard and Jane; and her brother, Jon.

James “Jim” Allan Lehman, 69, died Nov. 24, 2018, in Reston, Va. A Senior Foreign Service officer, Lehman held a number of positions within the Bureau of Overseas Building Operations (OBO) at the Department of State. He worked on numerous projects overseas including projects in Bolivia, Venezuela, Kuwait, Italy, Qatar, Mali, Republic of South Africa, Zambia, Senegal and Swaziland as well as various projects in Iraq. Lehman retired in 2016; however, he returned to OBO in 2017 to serve as the overseas project director for Brazzaville, Republic of Congo, until November 2018. He was happiest when he was working. Lehman is survived by his wife, Antonia. 

Wesley James Lincoln, 77, died March 20, in Raleigh, N.C. Lincoln served in the U.S. Army and later joined the Foreign Service. His overseas posts included Karachi, London, Manila and Pretoria. Domestically, he served in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. and Springfield, Va. After 20 years in the Foreign Service, Lincoln retired and worked for various companies that contracted with the Department of State. He is survived by his wife of 53 years, Beverly; five children, Pamela, Dennis, Douglas, Carol and Nicole, and 12 grandchildren. 

Roscoe H. Lindsey, 72, died Sept. 28, 2018, in Herndon, Va. A U.S. Navy veteran and English teacher, Lindsey joined the Foreign Service as a communications officer and served overseas in Rio de Janeiro, Brazzaville, Bonn, Maputo and Abu Dhabi. He retired in 2010 after 28 years of service. He also worked as an air traffic control trainer and volunteered at the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum, the Federal Aviation Association and Washington Dulles and Leesburg Airports. In 2011, Lindsey was selected to sing for Pope Benedict during a visit to Washington, D.C., and in 2015, he also sang for Pope Francis. Lindsey is survived by his sister-in-law, Ann; two nieces and two nephews. 

Gordon W. Murchie, 86, died March 16, in Alexandria, Va. Murchie began his career as a Foreign Service officer with USIA. He served in the Philippines, Thailand and Costa Rica. In 1985, Murchie began working for USAID, for which he traveled throughout Africa, Asia, Latin America, Eastern Europe and the Middle East. He retired in 1993 after 35 years of service. In retirement, Murchie became active in the wine industry, serving as president of the Vinifera Wine Growers Association, and he helped to create the Mount Vernon wine festival series which is now in its 23rd year. Murchie is survived by his wife, Anita; two children, Scott and Tia; and two granddaughters.

John George Sinnicki, 87, died March 9, in Barnegat, N.J. Sinnicki served in the U.S. Marine Corps from 1948-1952, where he participated in the Battle of the Chosin Reservoir during the Korean War. After his military service, Sinnicki worked as a Foreign Service officer and served in Mogadishu, San Salvador, Panama, Islamabad, Warsaw, Belgrade and Ottawa. He retired after 34 years of service and received a commendation for his efforts in reopening Embassy Kuwait after Operation Desert Storm. He was also a lifetime member of the Polish Legion of American Veterans and the Korean War Veterans Association. Sinnicki is survived by his wife, Marian; two children, John and Sandy; and five grandchildren.

MacAlan “Mac” Thompson, 77, died Dec. 17, 2018, in Thailand. Thompson graduated from Oregon State College in 1963 and then served in the U.S. Army which included a tour at the Korat Royal Thai Air Force Base. In 1968, Thompson joined USAID and served nine years in Laos before evacuating when Vientiane fell in 1975. He continued his work in Foreign Service at the Department of State by supporting the effort to protect, assist and resettle refugees from Laos, Cambodia and Vietnam to America. Thompson retired in 1992 and volunteered for the Thailand-Laos-Cambodia Brotherhood and supported the building of classrooms in Laos. Thompson is survived by his wife, Sunee; son, Chalee; and sister, Anne. 

Emily Lenora Towles, 95, died March 30, in Washington, D.C. Towles served at the Department of State for 43 years as a volunteer services assistant. She retired from Foreign Service in 1988 and enjoyed baking, spending time with her grandchildren and road trips with her husband, Anthus. Towles was also an active member of her church and participated in several church groups. Towles was predeceased by her husband and a daughter, Barbara. She is survived by two children, Thomas and Sheila.

Matthew H. Van Order, 90, died April 14, in Arlington, Va. Van Order attended the University of Rochester and received an M.A. from the University of Minnesota in 1951. After receiving his commission as an ensign, he served in the U.S. Navy until 1954. He entered the Foreign Service in 1958 and served in Mexico City; Karachi; Lusaka; and Monterrey, Mexico. He retired from the Foreign Service in 1983 and volunteered in the emergency room at Virginia Hospital Center for several years. He is survived by his wife of 46 years, Maria; three sons, Howard, Bernard and Christopher; and four grandchildren. 


May 2019

Byron Earl “Zip” Byron, 91, died Jan. 27, in Gainesville, Va. Byron served in the U.S. Army before graduating from the University of California, Berkeley in 1952. He joined the Foreign Service that same year and his overseas posts included the Belgian Congo, Lebanon, Cambodia, Congo (post-independence), Mozambique and Turkey. After retiring in 1980, Byron assisted his wife, Dori, in her real estate business. Byron is survived by his wife; three children, Samira, Carl and Leila; four stepchildren, Penny, Skip, Doug and Ted; 11 grandchildren; 17 great-grandchildren; and eight great-great-grandchildren.

Ralph R. Crain, 93, died Jan. 23, in Silver Spring, Md. He served in the U.S. Navy from 1944–1946. Afterward, he went to work for the General Services Administration and the Department of State. He joined the Foreign Service in the early 1970s and his posts included Saigon, Vietnam, and Paris. Crain received the Department’s Meritorious Honor Award and a medal for Civilian Service in Vietnam. He retired from the Foreign Service in 1984 and maintained an active life. Crain was predeceased by his wife of 63 years, Dolores. He is survived by three children, Terri, Betsy and Scott; seven grandchildren; and 10 great-grandchildren.

Dale Warren Dover, 69, died Jan. 14, in Alexandria, Va. Dover attended Harvard University where he played basketball and led the team to a top 10 national ranking. This led him to be a player and coach for the Portuguese National basketball team, which ultimately brought him to the Foreign Service in 1974. Dover served as vice consul in Denmark, as well as consul in Tel Aviv, Israel. He frequently returned to Harvard, receiving his doctorate in jurisprudence and becoming a corporate lawyer in 1984. In 1990, Dover was elected the first African-American mayor of Falls Church, Va., and opened his own law practice, in Alexandria, advocating mainly for children. Dover is survived by two children, Lauren and Noah; four brothers; and five grandchildren.

H. Roy Eidem, 96, died Jan. 2, in Naples, Fla. Eidem served in the U.S. military during WWII, Korea and three tours in Vietnam. He attended the University of Maryland and Catholic University of America, attaining multiple degrees including cultural anthropology. Eidem served in the Foreign Service in multiple posts including Milan; Rome; Monrovia, Liberia; and Japan. He retired in 1984. Eidem was a black belt in judo, a tai chi master and he became a Third Order Franciscan in 1961. Eidem is survived by his wife, Janet.

Maurice “Maury” Gralnek, 82 died Feb. 24, in Scottsdale, Ariz. Gralnek graduated from the University of Michigan in 1958 and served in Korea with the U.S. Army. He joined the Foreign Service and served in Barbados; Buenos Aires, Argentina; Saigon, Vietnam; Vientiane, Laos; Honolulu, Singapore, Tokyo, Frankfurt, Germany; Cairo; and Jakarta, Indonesia, before retiring in 1997 after 35 years. Gralnek then followed his Foreign Service specialist wife to Tokyo, Paris and Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. He received a cuisine diploma from the Cordon Bleu in Paris while indulging in his love for cooking. Gralnek later moved to Scottsdale and was active in the Phoenix Council of Foreign Relations and volunteered at the Phoenix Children’s Hospital. Gralnek is survived by his wife of 47 years, Wendy; two children, Karin and Andrew; two grandchildren; and two brothers.

Jeanne W. Kincaid, 69, died Feb. 14, in Quinton, N.J. Kincaid received a master’s of accounting from Gardner-Webb University. At the age of 56 she entered the Foreign Service, becoming an office management specialist and serving in Afghanistan, Tunisia, Serbia and Algeria. Kincaid retired in 2013 and traveled extensively throughout the U.S. and enjoyed gardening and reading. She also enjoyed time with her nieces and nephews and their children. Kincaid is survived by four sisters, Marcia, Chris, Laurie and Wendy; 12 nieces and nephews; and 19 great-nieces and great-nephews.

Ernest William Norwood, 89, died March 17, in Rockville, Md. Norwood served in the U.S. Army during the Korean War from 1951–1953. He began as a civil servant at the Department of State in 1959. He worked for the U.S. Information Agency where he was an accountant and budget analyst for Voice of America. After more than 34 years of service, he retired in 1994 and became a substitute teacher. Norwood was also an avid tennis player from the age of 12. He is survived by his wife of 39 years, Hilda; one son, Donatien; one daughter-in-law, Debra; and four grandchildren. 


April 2019

Elizabeth (Betty) Connell Schaeffer Briggs, 94, died Dec. 16, 2018 in Ferndale, Calif. Briggs earned a degree from Mary Washington College and a graduate degree from San Jose State University. She was married to William T. Briggs, a Foreign Service officer who served in the U.S. Army during World War II. Briggs moved with her husband to his overseas posts in Quito, Sao Paulo, Rio de Janeiro and Montevideo. In the U.S., Briggs worked as a librarian at different schools. After retirement, she volunteered at the Ferndale Public Library, set up an art library for The Ink People cooperative and served as secretary for the Ferndale Chamber of Commerce. Briggs is survived by her four children, Willa, Catherine, William and Ellen; two grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; and a nephew. 

Janice Lee Ferguson, 79, died Dec. 24, 2018, in Rehoboth Beach, Del. Ferguson served as a civil servant at the Department for more than 25 years. She traveled extensively for both work and pleasure in Asia, Europe and the Caribbean. After retiring, Ferguson led an active life and enjoyed working out at the gym, hosting family and friends and walking her dog. She was also an avid reader, crossword devotee and Dallas Cowboys fan. Ferguson is predeceased by her brother, Johnny, and is survived by her two children, Shannon and Johnny; a son-in-law; one grandchild; and two brothers. 

Theodore Edmonds Gildred, 83, died Jan. 3, in Cameron, Mont. Gildred graduated from Leland Stanford Jr. University and then served in the U.S. Army in Germany. He served as the U.S. Ambassador to Argentina, 1986–1989. Gildred was the founding member of the Buenos Aires chapter of  the Young Presidents’ Organization, which promoted understanding and cooperation between countries. Gildred was also a real estate developer in California, a licensed racecar driver and an avid aviator. He was inducted into the San Diego Air and Space Museum Hall of Fame in 2010. Gildred is survived by his wife, Heidi; two sisters, Lynne and Helen; seven children, Theodore, Jennifer, Edward, John, Tory, Stephen and Kimberly; and four grandchildren.  

Lewis G. Gilstrap, 83, died Dec. 18, 2018, in Plantation, Fla. Gilstrap served in both the U.S. Air Force and U.S. Army for 25 years, during which he was assigned to the Embassy’s Army Attaché office where he served in Oslo, Stockholm, Moscow and Wellington. Gilstrap later joined the Foreign Service. During his 20 years as an FSO, his posts included Kingston, Kuala Lumpur, Panama and El Salvador. Gilstrap was predeceased by his wife of 56 years, Kathaleen. He is survived by his two sons, Scott and Alan.

Arthur Winston Lewis, 92, died on Jan. 10, in Wilmette, Ill. He served in the U.S. Navy and taught naval science in the Navy ROTC program at Dartmouth, where he previously earned his bachelor’s and master’s degrees. He served in the Foreign Service for 20 years, and his posts included Romania, Zambia, Ethiopia, Nigeria and Sierra Leone. In retirement, Lewis served as a senior consultant for Nord Resources Corp that operated mining interests in Sierra Leone and also enjoyed tennis, travel and reading. He was predeceased by his wife, Fay, and daughter, Dian. He is survived by his daughter, Dale; three grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren.  

Alan W. Lukens, 94, died Jan. 5, in Chevy Chase, Md. Lukens served in the U.S. Army during World War II with the 10th Mountain Division and the 20th Armored Division in Europe, where his unit liberated the concentration camp at Dachau. After his military service, Lukens graduated with honors from Princeton University. Lukens served in the Foreign Service for 36 years. His posts included Istanbul, Ankara, Martinique, Bangui, Rabat and Paris, and he served as the U.S. Ambassador to the Republic of Congo from 1984—1987. Lukens also served as deputy chief of mission in Dakar, Nairobi and Copenhagen. In retirement, Lukens remained an active member of the D.C. community, Princeton Alumni Affairs and served in prominent roles on other committees and clubs. Lukens is survived by his wife of 56 years, Susan; his four children, Lewis, Francie, Susie and Timothy; and 10 grandchildren. 

John H. Malvin, 85, died Nov. 25, 2018, in Hershey, Pa. Malvin served in the U.S. Army and then graduated from West Virginia University. Malvin joined the Foreign Service, and his overseas posts included Muscat, Oman and Djibouti. Malvin retired from the Foreign Service after more than 10 years of service. He was an active leader for the Boy Scouts of America. Malvin is survived by his wife of 60 years, Mary; two children, John and Pamela; and four grandchildren. 

Blaine Clifford Richardson, 83, died Nov. 17, 2018, in Sarasota, Fla. Richardson graduated from the University of Maryland and attended the George Washington Graduate School. He joined the Foreign Service in 1966 and his overseas posts included Laos, Italy and Vietnam. Richardson also served as director in Jordan, Lebanon and Syria, as well as acting Mission director in Damascus and Syria. He is survived by his wife Jeanette. 

Harry Walter Shlaudeman, 92, died Dec. 5, 2018, in San Luis Obispo, Calif. Shlaudeman served in the U.S. Marine Corps and later attended Stanford University, graduating with a Bachelor of Arts in English literature. He joined the Foreign Service in 1954 and served four decades in various positions throughout Latin America. Shlaudeman served as the U.S. Ambassador in Caracas, Lima, Buenos Aires, Central America, Brasilia and Managua. After 38 years of service, Shlaudeman retired and received the Presidential Medal of Freedom. In retirement, he remained active in discussions related to U.S. foreign policy in Latin America, but he also enjoyed golfing, traveling and was a passionate Washington Redskins fan. Shlaudeman was predeceased by his wife, Carol. He is survived by three children, Karl, Katherine and Harry; and two grandchildren. 

Robert Roy Walker III, 75, died Sept. 7, 2018, in Monett, Mo. He served in the U.S. Air Force before joining the Foreign Service. As a Foreign Service officer, Walker’s overseas posts included France, West Germany, East Berlin, Malta, Zaire, Malaysia and England. He was a train enthusiast and enjoyed collecting arrowheads and coins. Robert is survived by two sons, Robert and Philip; a daughter-in-law; four grandchildren; and two sisters. 

Erik Walton, 15, died Nov. 15, 2018, in Beijing, China. Walton, an eligible family member and son of a Foreign Service officer, lived and attended school in five different countries including Kenya, Germany, Malawi, China and the United States. He was a star athlete and enjoyed karaoke, music, acting and traveling the world. Walton is predeceased by his mother, Stephanie. He is survived by his father, Christopher; three sisters, Danaan, Brenna and Gwendolyn; and grandmother, Nancy.


March 2019

Dianne Marie Andruch, 68, died Sept. 4, 2018 in Tucson, Ariz. She was a Foreign Service officer, both as an office management specialist and later as a consular officer, serving in Indonesia and Mexico and as consul general in Amsterdam. Andruch also served as the deputy assistant secretary for Overseas Citizens Services in the Bureau of Consular Affairs. In retirement, Andruch taught Pilates, traveled and knit. She is predeceased by her husband.

Kenneth Holmes Bailey Jr., 86, died Nov. 25, 2018. Bailey served in the U.S. Navy during the Korean War. He received his undergraduate degree from George Washington University and graduate degrees from Georgetown University and George Washington University. He joined the Foreign Service in 1963. His overseas posts included Chile, Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, South Africa, Hungary, France and Mauritania. After retiring from the Foreign Service in 1987, Bailey worked for Litton Corporation and EG&G; was a volunteer for the Smithsonian Museum of American History and Friendship Place; and was an active member of St. Columba’s Episcopal Church. He was predeceased by his wife, Elizabeth Anne Ellis, and is survived by his two children, Julia Holmes Bailey and Thomas Ellis Bailey, two grandchildren and a sister. 

David William Cox, 79, died Dec. 1, 2018. Cox entered the Foreign Service in 1961 and served for more than 25 years as a Foreign Service officer. His overseas posts included Colombia, Switzerland and Venezuela, as well as Suriname where he served as deputy chief of mission. After retiring from the Foreign Service, Cox served part time in the Freedom of Information Office as a civil service reviewer and senior reviewer for nearly 20 years. In retirement, he enjoyed traveling with his wife, Oma, and visiting his daughter, son-in-law and two grandchildren.

Dante Espejo, 80, died Nov. 10, 2018 in Aldie, Va. He served in the Foreign Service for more than 20 years. His overseas posts included Ecuador, Hong Kong, Saudi Arabia, the Bahamas, Malaysia, Greece, Suriname and the Philippines. After retiring in 2003, he enjoyed karaoke. Espejo was predeceased by his wife, Charita Geraldiso Espejo. He is survived by his five children, Edwin, Evelyn, Nadia, Eric and Earl; five grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; his sister, Minerva Espejo; and his brother, Ronald Espejo.

Allen C. Hansen, 93, died Sept. 16, 2018. Hansen served in the U.S. Navy, on the USS Alsea, during World War II. He graduated from Syracuse University with a B.A. in political science and from the University of Pennsylvania with a master’s in American studies. Hansen was recalled to active Navy duty in 1951, serving as a naval intelligence officer during the Korean War. He joined the Foreign Service in 1954 and served for 32 years, working in nine countries, as well as in Washington, D.C. His overseas posts included Venezuela, Mexico, British Guiana, Spain, Uruguay, Bolivia, Pakistan and Peru—where he was technical advisor on the first-ever United States Information Agency anti-narcotics film called “The Trip.” After retiring, Hansen wrote and also volunteered at the Associates of the American Foreign Service Worldwide bookstore and the annual book fair. He is survived by his wife of 62 years, Charmaine; his five children, Robert, Annette, Katherine Freeman, Alicia Hatcher and Mark; 12 grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.

Charles V. North died Feb. 20, 2017. North began his service at Voice of America, where he held several positions. Later, he served as the assistant information officer in Ghana and Colombia and the public affairs officer in Ecuador. After retiring, North acted in local theater productions, was a volunteer docent and painted. North was predeceased by his wife, Helen H. North. 

Betsy Ross Peters, 90, died Nov. 21, 2018. Peters earned a bachelor’s degree from Baylor University, a master’s degree from the University of Maryland and a doctorate from the University of Wyoming. She worked for the Social Security Administration and the National Endowment for the Arts before joining the Foreign Service. As a Foreign Service officer, Peters worked in the Middle East, Europe and Africa and continued to deploy for temporary assignments after retiring. In retirement, Peters enjoyed golf and was an active volunteer. Peters was predeceased by her husband of 68 years, Dr. Oliver Leon Peters. She is survived by her daughters, Elizabeth Peters Bierer (Michael) and Sidney Peters; her son, Robert Mitchell Peters; and five grandchildren. 

David Rowe, 86, died Nov. 10, 2018, in Hendersonville, N.C. Rowe earned a B.A. from the University of North Carolina and an M.A. from Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies. He served as a commissioned artillery officer on the USS Missouri in the South Pacific before joining the Foreign Service in 1960. As a Foreign Service officer, Rowe served in Europe and South America, as well as at the U.S. Mission to the U.N. He also served as Director of the U.S. Mission to UNESCO in Paris. After retiring from the Foreign Service, Rowe started an art gallery and a school. He was also director of what is now the Hathaway House at Middlebury College. Rowe read extensively in Buddhist thought, enjoyed gardening and played tennis. He is survived by his brother, Peter.


February 2019

Egle Camozzo, 92, died Nov. 2, in Easton, Md. Camozzo worked for the Foreign Service Institute as an Italian language instructor for more than 30 years and finished her career as head of the Italian and Portuguese departments. After retiring in 1986, Camozzo enjoyed playing tennis and traveling. She is survived by her daughter, son, three grandchildren and two great grandchildren.

Michael E. C. Ely, 89, died Oct. 18. Ely graduated from Princeton University and from Harvard Graduate School of Public Administration (Harvard Kennedy School of Government). He served in the U.S. Army Artillery during the Korean conflict. Ely was a Foreign Service officer for 36 years with overseas posts that included Brussels, Tokyo, Paris, Rome, Algiers, Mogadishu and Kuala Lumpur. In retirement, he was an active member of St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, the Arlington Sister Cities Association and DACOR. 

Donald S. Harris, 96, died Sept. 30. Harris was a staff sergeant in the U.S. Army’s 98th Infantry Division during World War II, serving in the Pacific Theater and the post-war occupation of Japan. He also served a number of years in the Army Reserve as a first lieutenant in the infantry. After graduating from Yale University, Harris joined the Foreign Service and served overseas in Glasgow, Hamburg, Frankfurt, Bremen and West Berlin, as well as in Israel and Indonesia. He retired in 1979. In retirement, Harris enjoyed gardening, ballroom dancing and golfing.

John J. Helble, 84, died Nov. 20 in Aldie, Va. Helble was a Foreign Service officer whose overseas posts included Puerto la Cruz, Saigon, Hue, Kuala Lumpur and Dhaka. He also served as the Department of State’s advisor to the Commander-in-Chief, Pacific Command, in Honolulu. In addition, Helble worked in the Freedom of Information Office of Declassification. After retirement in 1985, Helble developed and operated a commercial wine grape vineyard and winery. He also enjoyed golf, gardening and football. Helble is survived by his wife of 62 years, Joan; his son, Stuart; his daughter, Ramona; and five grandchildren.

George H. Thigpen, 95, died Nov. 18. Thigpen served with the U.S Army’s 84th Infantry Division in Europe during World War II. He later served as a Foreign Service officer, with posts in the U.S.S.R., Cuba, Paraguay, Uruguay, Panama, Costa Rica, the United Kingdom and Colombia. Thigpen is survived by six children and seven grandchildren.

Robert R. Walker III, 75, died Sept. 7 in Monett, Mo. Walker served in the U.S. Air Force for four years before joining the Foreign Service. As a Foreign Service officer, he served overseas in Berlin, Bonn, Frankfurt, Valletta, Kinshasa, Kuala Lumpur and London. He was a train enthusiast and enjoyed collecting arrowheads and coins. Walker is survived by his two sons, Robert R. Walker IV and Philip Walker; four grandchildren; and two sisters.

Robert-A-Young

Robert A. “Bob” Young, 85, died Aug. 29. Young graduated from Gannon University and received an ROTC commission in the U.S. Army. He later received a graduate degree from American University. Young served on active duty for two years and remained in the Army Reserve for 30 years, retiring as a full colonel. In 1962, Young joined the Foreign Service and served for 20 years. His posts included Bangkok, Mexico City and Washington, D.C. After retiring from the Foreign Service, Young worked for United States International University and Chulalongkorn University in Bangkok. In his retirement, he enjoyed gardening and playing tennis and bridge. 

Questions concerning employee deaths should be directed to the Office of Casualty Assistance at (202) 736-4302. Inquiries concerning deaths of retired employees should be directed to the Office of Retirement at (202) 261-8960. For specific questions on submitting an obituary, please contact Amanda Richard at RichardAJ@state.gov.